FIRST DAY OF AUTUMN - 23rd SEPTEMBER


On 22 or 23 September, the sun shines directly on the equator and the length of day and night are nearly equal in all parts of the world.
This day is known as the autumnal equinox.
The Reason for the Seasons
Many people think that some parts of the year are hotter because we're nearer to the Sun, but the real reason is that the Earth is wonky (tilted).
Why do we have seasons?
We have seasons because the earth is tilted (wonky) as it makes its yearly journey around the sun.
The Earth's tilt
The Earth's axis is tilted at an angle of 23.5 degrees. This means that the Earth is always "pointing" to one side as it goes around the Sun. So, sometimes the Sun is in the direction that the Earth is pointing, but not at other times. The varying amounts of sunlight around the Earth during the year, creates the seasons.
The tilt of the Earth's AXIS is the most important reason why seasons occur.
We have hot summers and cold winters because of the tilt of the Earth's axis.
The tilt of the Earth means the Earth will lean towards the Sun (Summer) or lean away from the Sun (Winter) 6 months later. In between these, Spring and Autumn will occur.
Autumn
The north pole begins to move away from the Sun. The Sun rises lower in the sky so the days start getting shorter. When the Sun is at its mid-point in the sky, we reach the 'autumn equinox', around 22 September. Day and night are both 12 hours long and its the beginning of autumn.




x_3bfa6ee9

REMEMBERING 9/11 - 15th ANNIVERSARY


 Each year, one of the nost moving commemorations of September 11 is the Tribute in Light. 88 searchlights tha stretch four miles into the sky to create a ghostly monment to the Twin Towers

In honor of the 14th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, numerous exhibits, concerts, films, readings, talks, performances, and memorial servics will reflect on the desvatation of that day and its aftermath, each on a poignant reminder of why those towers of light (which return once again at dusk on September 11) still have the power to choke us up. 




x_3bfa6ee9

OUR LADY OF VICTORY - 8th SEPTEMBER

Our Lady’s birthday is generally celebrated by the Catholic church on the 8th September and so this date has been adopted as an opportunity to honour the different images of Mary. In Malaga, people celebrate the feast day of the patron of the city, ‘Our Lady of Victory’.
As her name would suggest, the ‘Virgen de la Victoria’ is venerated due the the role she is believed to have played in various military victories.
The first was in 1571 at the battle of Lepanto, near Greece, when the Holy League (made up of Spain and the Papacy among others) fought the Ottoman Empire. Christians prayed the Rosary in St. Peter’s Square in Rome in the hope that Mary would intercede for them, winning them God’s help in keeping the Muslim Empire out of Western Europe. A miraculous victory was won.
In Malaga itself, a statue of Our Lady of Victory is thought to have been kept in Ferdinand’s chapel in the military encampment during the siege when Malaga was re-conquered by the Catholic King and Queen. In 1867, Pope Pius IX appointed this image of Mary as patron of the city.
Thus the 8th September is a local holiday. On the last Sunday in August, in preparation for the feast day, the image of the ‘Virgen de la Victoria’ is taken to Malaga cathedral where a novena (a particularly powerful way of praying the Rosary) is said in devotion to Our Lady. On Sunday there will be a procession much like those one sees during Semana Santa, during which the image is carried to the Santuario de la Victoria in the Plaza Santuario, near the Plaza de la Merced.


x_3bfa6ee9

GREAT FIRE OF LONDON




At one o'clock in the morning on 2 September 1666, Thomas Farriner was asleep over his bakehouse in Pudding Lane, in the City of London, when a servant rushed in to wake him. The bedroom was full of smoke and the staircase was already in flames. He and his wife and daughter , with the servant, escaped through a small window and watched the blaze spread to his neighbours timber houses. The Great Fire of London had begun. What started as a small small fire raged for four days as an enormous fire, destroying two thirds of the City: 13,200 houses, 430 streets and 89 churches. The fire could be seen from forty miles round the capital.


How do we know so much about the Fire of London?
The reason why we know so many details about the fire is that two men who were alive at that time kept diaries in which they described the dramatic events. The names of these two people were Samuel Pepys and John Evelyn.
Fire Prevention
To prevent such a disaster happening again King Charles ll commanded that all new houses in London should be of stone and brick not wood. Christopher Wren constructed St Paul's Cathedral (between 1675 and 1711) as well as many churches.
 Monument
Not long after the fire a momument, designed by Sir Christopher Wren, was erected between 1671 and 1677, as the City's memorial to the Great Fire in 1666.
x_3bfa6ee9